About jacqueleeneng

Into the pumpernickle bread they give out at the Cheesecake Factory

Personality Playlist: Enid & Rebecca

By Jacqueleen Eng ’19

I’m starting a new type of playlist where I select songs I think fit characters from books, films, shows, my imagination, etc. and they will from here on out be called ~Personality Playlists~

To start, I thought I’d pick some of my favorite badass 90s girls Enid Coleslaw and Rebecca Doppelmeyer from Daniel Clowes’ comic book series Eightball and later their own novel, Ghost World (which was also turned into a cult classic movie starring a young Scarjo and Thora Birch and the charming Steve Buscemi)

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Horn Gallery Spotlight: Teen Suicide

bal-teen-suicide-on-signing-to-run-for-cover-records-rereleasesBy Jacqueleen Eng ’19

Horn Gallery goers, you are in for a packed weekend. Not only do we have Jlin throwing down Saturday night, but one of my favorite bands right now, Teen Suicide, will be performing on Friday. Hailing from Silver Springs, Maryland, Teen Suicide (who are undergoing a name change) formed in 2009 and amassed a cult following after their brief breakup in 2013. The band formed when the members were young, and their recent album It’s the Big Joyous Celebration, Let’s Stir the Honeypot will be the last album released under their current name, inspired by the 1988 cult classic Heathers. (According to the band’s overactive Twitter @fugazi420, they may be now called the Hot Sloppy Joe Boys. I tweeted at them to find out. Me: @fugazi420 excuse the mayb dumb q but are you actually now called the Hot Sloppy Joe Boys? Them: @yung_sangria im trying to get the rest of the band on board w/ it lol – sam)

Teen Suicide has released many projects, including the album i will be my own hell because there is a devil inside my body, and the EPs DC snuff film and waste yrself. To call Teen Suicide an angsty band might be sort of a cop-out, but it’s probably the best way I can describe them. Singer and guitarist Sam Ray has been open with his past drug habits and depression, and these themes are found in the band’s music. I’d say the reason for the band’s mass following is related to their exploration of experiences teenagers can identify with. Ray’s social media presence probably helps, too. Aggressive? Sarcastic? I’m not entirely sure, but I’ve been following him for a while on various media outlets and he’s entertaining, to say the least.

Definitely try to catch this show if you’re into that whole DIY-lo-fi-sad-boy-angst-maybe-trash-maybe-moshing-but-not-too-hardcore-moshing-basement-Baltimore-Julia-Brown-Ricky-Eat-Acid-etc.-Elvis-Depressedly-Foxes-In-Fiction-ambient-cool-cool-cool sound like I know most of you are.

Doors open at 9 p.m. Show time TBD with openers Sedna’s Not Alone and Kenyon’s very own Peter Hardy!

One Love Song for Sam Ray

By Jacqueleen Eng ’19

I read many interviews of Sam Ray before writing this. Some by FADER, Impose, etc., and they all seemto describe him as some sort of mysterious, caffeine-fueled, disheveled, (“a cry for help?”) borderline-almost genius. Too far? Maybe. I cannot tell you all about his tumblr_inline_n2t33nelEG1qf58lp.jpgalbum and styles and compilations and singles and projects because there are so many, and that’s why I’ve come to look up to him and his collaborators.

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Now Playing: Yeezy Season 3

By Jacqueleen Eng ’19

I am a Kanye fan. The only true fight I got into with one of my best friends in high school was about a Kanye concert. I skipped my third-period Spanish class to buy Kanye tickets on my phone in the bathroom, and I had my mother trying to buy them too. So it only makes sense that when I saw that a few theaters in Columbus were screening Yeezy Season 3 that I would buy tickets, rent the tragic 2011 Ford Focus through the UhaulCarShare, and force a friend (who was in it for a non-Peirce meal) to come with me.

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Playlist: Tales from Second Floor McBride

By Jacqueleen Eng ’19

Long side second floor McBride is many things. Purgatory? A frat house? A dysfunctional grow operation? Certainly, but no matter how chaotic it may get, there’s something oddly endearing about living here.

My room happens to be nestled in the corner between another double and the infamous gender neutral bathroom. Originally a men’s bathroom, only the guys regularly use it—not only because some protested its gender neutrality, but because it’s gross. There’s a maintenance worker here at least once a week fixing a toilet or the sink, and there’s routinely sad cans of Natty Ice forlorn in the shower and suspicious half-eaten jars of salsa on the shelf. In typical teenage fashion, most of second floor plays music in the shower (and everywhere else), and I happen to have the advantage of not only hearing each song, but I’m so close I can Shazam it! Here are some typical tunes:

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Breakfast in Gambier

By Jacqueleen Eng ’19

51-Pb5T+23LSupertramp’s Breakfast In America is one of my favorite albums ever. It features four hit Billboard singles some of which you’ve probably heard before (two of which are featured in Paul Thomas Anderson’s 1999 hit movie, Magnolia)—“The Logical Song,” “Goodbye Stranger,” “Take the Long Way Home,” and “Breakfast In America.” Released in 1979, Supertramp is not a group I would predict myself enjoying, as they’re described as a “progressive rock” band that saw more success catering to the mainstream pop audience. So I guess that means I am mainstream pop audience. But I don’t understand what I find appealing about the album other than that it’s just catchy. My favorite song fluctuates between “Goodbye Stranger” which is presumably about a one night stand or leaving a relationship (but some think it’s about weed?) and “Take the Long Way Home,” which I don’t have a reading for other than sometimes you should just take the long way home… or as too many people from my high school quoted in the yearbook, “life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.”

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The Problem With Sad Indie Trash

By Jacqueleen Eng ’19

unnamedI have a friend who might be Spotify famous. His playlist titled “emotional dreams and drunk feels” somehow gained 55 followers, which is achievement since Spotify isn’t the most social of the social media platforms. The playlist features music of the genre what I like to call “sad indie trash.” That kind of lo-fi music where the lead singer may or may not actually have the ability to sing, their releases are probably only through Bandcamp, (where they sell hand stenciled cassette tapes)—the kind of music that’s pretty popular at liberal arts schools like this one. Bands like Elvis Depressedly, Teen Suicide, Pill Friends, Spook Houses and Modern Baseball. Labels like Double Double Whammy, Too Far Gone Records, and Father/Daughter Records. Darker than your typical shoegaze and garage surf rock. I like this type of music. You can find me listening to my own playlist titled “sad indie trash” and crying somewhere on the third floor of the library. But, I’ve noticed that most of the artists that dominate this genre are male. Usually white males. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but there is certainly a lack of diversity in this scene that is hard to ignore.

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Joanna Newsom and I

by Jacqueleen Eng ’19

joannanewsom_divers_mini_sq-2329b57442762a5f0e77c23c66d62ebf86081177-s300-c85The first time I heard Joanna Newsom was freshman year of high school. Honors English nine, period 7 was a special place. Tucked away in the A Wing, Ms. Marohn hung curtains on tack boards to make it look like we windows. She had an old wooden Crosley in the back, a Pink Floyd poster on the wall, and passed around cumquats and dried apricot during class. She was a vegan, and most of her flowy skirts and warm sweaters came from thrift stores. She was the closest thing Chatham High School had to a “hipster”— and she loved Joanna Newsom.

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